Turn Art Lookers into Art Buyers

November 2, 2009

I go to a lot of art openings and typically don’t hang around all that long at any one place. I look at the art and, when possible, have a few words with the artist, after which it’s on to the next show. I recently had a chance encounter with an artist whose opening I had been to several nights before. We exchanged pleasantries, and I mentioned how much I enjoyed the show. The artist thanked me and, as we were about to part, asked somewhat cryptically, “Did you look at the art? I was really feeling? ” with emphasis on the word “look.” Without thinking, I answered, “Of course,” but then felt a curious twinge of guilt as I walked off wondering, well… did I really look at it? Yes I did, but the artist’s implication seemed to be that perhaps I didn’t look at it “enough.” Hmmm.

So I get to thinking– what does it mean to “look at the art,” and even more to the point, what does it mean to look at it enough? And even more importantly, what does it mean to look at art enough to become so excited about it that you buy it? Enough according to whom, and who decides that, and how is getting the art looked at enough accomplished? And how does looking at art progress to buying that art? In particular, what does this “act of looking” mean from the artist’s perspective as distinguished from that of the viewer?

Let’s start with the artist. If you’re an artist, whose responsibility do you think it is to assure that when people look at your art, they look at it “enough,” and even more importantly, that their experience of looking is a productive one? Would it be theirs or yours? Right. Yours. And whose responsibility do you think it is to make sure they continue to look at your art for as long as possible? Right again. Yours. You see, in a democracy, people are free to look at art for as long they feel like looking at it, and take whatever actions they want to based on what they see– or think they see– including looking longer or hitting the road.

I’m amazed at how many artists actually believe that the viewers are responsible not only for looking at, but more importantly, understanding and appreciating art a certain amount, whatever that amount may be, that a minimum looking time is required in order to achieve threshold levels of understanding and appreciation, and here’s the kicker– that anyone who wants to buy something has to want to buy it bad enough. I mean are you kidding me? The viewers are supposed to do all the work– even work to buy it? How self-infatuated can artists possibly be to believe that total strangers are obliged to schedule fixed amounts of time out of their busy lives to commune with art, get up to speed on it, and ultimately prove how much they want it in order to be gifted with the privilege of ownership?

Now consider the viewer. Oddly enough, people who look at art tend to see things differently than artists. Sure, the hardcore vortex of an artist’s fan base wants all art all the time, but how about the rest of us? We’re taking it easy, visiting galleries, having happy banter. Or maybe we’re early for our restaurant reservation, so we slip into a gallery and pass time against the backdrop of the art. One thing we don’t do is leave home determined to come back with art. Generally speaking, art has to absolutely nail someone for them to stop in their tracks, shut up, stand still, and give it more than a passing glance– which doesn’t happen often. (Take you, for instance. You see plenty of art. How often do you stop? Precisely. Not that often.)

The truth is that most encounters with art are fleeting, and most people want electrifyingly stunning reasons to stand there and stare. What kind of reasons? Reasons they understand and identify with– reasons that YOU the artists provide– or else they move on to the next work of art or artist or gallery or hors d’oeuvre or dinner or whatever. Yes, it’s your job to slow them down, hopefully to the point where they become so entranced with your modus that they’ll ultimately want to take a piece of you home, aka buy something.

The solution? There’s only one. You or your gallery supplies a brief introduction that enables anyone to grasp or understand or appreciate your art on some fundamental level really fast, no matter who they are or how much or how little they know about art– from potato heads to PhD’s. And furthermore, that this introduction is instantly accessible, like for instance, within arm’s reach of the art. Don’t write a novella, and please, oh please, avoid bombastic blather that requires an MFA to decipher (nobody likes being talked down to). One or two or three well-worded compelling comprehensible sentences in plain English that ordinary people can understand and latch onto will be abundantly adequate to incite enthusiasm for your art.

You see, those few sentences are like the first few paragraphs or liner notes or introduction of a book. In fact, convincing someone to buy a book is remarkably similar to convincing someone to buy art. With a book, the first thing anyone does who’s not familiar with it is to pick it up and read a few sentences. The more compelling those sentences, the harder it is to put the book back down, and the greater the chances they’ll buy it. The same goes for art. It periodically stops people, and next on their agendas, they want to know more– like what exactly are they looking at? And if there’s a quick concise answer at hand, chances are excellent they’ll read it, and if it’s convincing enough, they might even act on it. People who feel like they get what they’re looking at, or think they get it– assuming it resonates with them– are more likely than people who don’t get it to stick around long enough for you or your operatives to get busy and sell them something.

Otherwise, if your art simply sits there unexplained, those who stop won’t stop for long. Why? Because once they’re done looking, there’s nothing left to do but leave. And don’t expect them to ask for help. Why? Because many people who go to galleries (or wherever art is for sale) don’t even know that asking is an option, and most of the rest are afraid to open their mouths because they’re petrified they’ll say something stupid. So please– give them a fighting chance to understand, appreciate, and maybe even buy your art.

Forget this bullshit mindset that people who look at art are required to get educated about it on their own. That is a lose-lose proposition, and so outdated and so self-centered as to be laughable. Maybe in the good old days you could use that tact to stupefy tinhorns into buying (“If I can’t understand it, it must be good”), but not any more. The business has changed big time. Art buyers are no longer naive enough to believe that artists and/or art dealers possess mystical inscrutable knowledge that can only be comprehended if they tremble in deference, ask no questions, nod in agreement, open their wallets, and buy.

In fact, confuse today’s buyers and they’re off to the next venue. They want to know what they’re getting, why its significant, how it’s priced, what it means, who made it, what the resume looks like, what the prognosis is for the future, and more. Most importantly, they want to feel like they’ve made intelligent choices, and that they’re getting good value for what many believe are their “investments.” And last but not least, when their friends come over for dinner and say stuff like, “Bob, is that art new?” Bob will share his knowledge (starting with the three-sentence introduction he read 30 seconds after first laying eyes on it), and proceed to overwhelm his friends with his discriminating taste and sophistication– and irrevocably emerge a winner– which Bob could never have done without your (the artist’s) help. Capiche? Excellent.

Several hints for crafting compelling copy:

* Your introductory might subtly suggest typical positive responses that viewers have to your art. If you’re like most artists, you already know what people like about it. So make it easy for first timers, feed them the secrets up front, and save them the trouble of having to mangle their brains trying figure out why they like what they’re looking at.

* Pair a several sentence explanation with each work of art, knowing that specifics are easier to grasp than generalities. It can be about anything– color, shape, size, materials, technique, medium, inspiration, mood, thoughts, justifications, beliefs, the music you listened to while you made it, why you made it, where you made it, how you made it, how long it took to make, and so on. Keep it simple; keep it clear; make viewers want to know more.

Remember– nobody owes you or your oeuvre one nanosecond of attention. It is your duty, and yours alone, to convince people that what you communicate through your art is valid, worthwhile, and engaging enough for them to make it a part of their lives. It’s that simple and no more complicated.

Source : http://www.artbusiness.com

Turn Art Lookers into Art Buyers

November 2, 2009

I go to a lot of art openings and typically don’t hang around all that long at any one place. I look at the art and, when possible, have a few words with the artist, after which it’s on to the next show. I recently had a chance encounter with an artist whose opening I had been to several nights before. We exchanged pleasantries, and I mentioned how much I enjoyed the show. The artist thanked me and, as we were about to part, asked somewhat cryptically, “Did you look at the art? I was really feeling? ” with emphasis on the word “look.” Without thinking, I answered, “Of course,” but then felt a curious twinge of guilt as I walked off wondering, well… did I really look at it? Yes I did, but the artist’s implication seemed to be that perhaps I didn’t look at it “enough.” Hmmm.

So I get to thinking– what does it mean to “look at the art,” and even more to the point, what does it mean to look at it enough? And even more importantly, what does it mean to look at art enough to become so excited about it that you buy it? Enough according to whom, and who decides that, and how is getting the art looked at enough accomplished? And how does looking at art progress to buying that art? In particular, what does this “act of looking” mean from the artist’s perspective as distinguished from that of the viewer?

Let’s start with the artist. If you’re an artist, whose responsibility do you think it is to assure that when people look at your art, they look at it “enough,” and even more importantly, that their experience of looking is a productive one? Would it be theirs or yours? Right. Yours. And whose responsibility do you think it is to make sure they continue to look at your art for as long as possible? Right again. Yours. You see, in a democracy, people are free to look at art for as long they feel like looking at it, and take whatever actions they want to based on what they see– or think they see– including looking longer or hitting the road.

I’m amazed at how many artists actually believe that the viewers are responsible not only for looking at, but more importantly, understanding and appreciating art a certain amount, whatever that amount may be, that a minimum looking time is required in order to achieve threshold levels of understanding and appreciation, and here’s the kicker– that anyone who wants to buy something has to want to buy it bad enough. I mean are you kidding me? The viewers are supposed to do all the work– even work to buy it? How self-infatuated can artists possibly be to believe that total strangers are obliged to schedule fixed amounts of time out of their busy lives to commune with art, get up to speed on it, and ultimately prove how much they want it in order to be gifted with the privilege of ownership?

Now consider the viewer. Oddly enough, people who look at art tend to see things differently than artists. Sure, the hardcore vortex of an artist’s fan base wants all art all the time, but how about the rest of us? We’re taking it easy, visiting galleries, having happy banter. Or maybe we’re early for our restaurant reservation, so we slip into a gallery and pass time against the backdrop of the art. One thing we don’t do is leave home determined to come back with art. Generally speaking, art has to absolutely nail someone for them to stop in their tracks, shut up, stand still, and give it more than a passing glance– which doesn’t happen often. (Take you, for instance. You see plenty of art. How often do you stop? Precisely. Not that often.)

The truth is that most encounters with art are fleeting, and most people want electrifyingly stunning reasons to stand there and stare. What kind of reasons? Reasons they understand and identify with– reasons that YOU the artists provide– or else they move on to the next work of art or artist or gallery or hors d’oeuvre or dinner or whatever. Yes, it’s your job to slow them down, hopefully to the point where they become so entranced with your modus that they’ll ultimately want to take a piece of you home, aka buy something.

The solution? There’s only one. You or your gallery supplies a brief introduction that enables anyone to grasp or understand or appreciate your art on some fundamental level really fast, no matter who they are or how much or how little they know about art– from potato heads to PhD’s. And furthermore, that this introduction is instantly accessible, like for instance, within arm’s reach of the art. Don’t write a novella, and please, oh please, avoid bombastic blather that requires an MFA to decipher (nobody likes being talked down to). One or two or three well-worded compelling comprehensible sentences in plain English that ordinary people can understand and latch onto will be abundantly adequate to incite enthusiasm for your art.

You see, those few sentences are like the first few paragraphs or liner notes or introduction of a book. In fact, convincing someone to buy a book is remarkably similar to convincing someone to buy art. With a book, the first thing anyone does who’s not familiar with it is to pick it up and read a few sentences. The more compelling those sentences, the harder it is to put the book back down, and the greater the chances they’ll buy it. The same goes for art. It periodically stops people, and next on their agendas, they want to know more– like what exactly are they looking at? And if there’s a quick concise answer at hand, chances are excellent they’ll read it, and if it’s convincing enough, they might even act on it. People who feel like they get what they’re looking at, or think they get it– assuming it resonates with them– are more likely than people who don’t get it to stick around long enough for you or your operatives to get busy and sell them something.

Otherwise, if your art simply sits there unexplained, those who stop won’t stop for long. Why? Because once they’re done looking, there’s nothing left to do but leave. And don’t expect them to ask for help. Why? Because many people who go to galleries (or wherever art is for sale) don’t even know that asking is an option, and most of the rest are afraid to open their mouths because they’re petrified they’ll say something stupid. So please– give them a fighting chance to understand, appreciate, and maybe even buy your art.

Forget this bullshit mindset that people who look at art are required to get educated about it on their own. That is a lose-lose proposition, and so outdated and so self-centered as to be laughable. Maybe in the good old days you could use that tact to stupefy tinhorns into buying (“If I can’t understand it, it must be good”), but not any more. The business has changed big time. Art buyers are no longer naive enough to believe that artists and/or art dealers possess mystical inscrutable knowledge that can only be comprehended if they tremble in deference, ask no questions, nod in agreement, open their wallets, and buy.

In fact, confuse today’s buyers and they’re off to the next venue. They want to know what they’re getting, why its significant, how it’s priced, what it means, who made it, what the resume looks like, what the prognosis is for the future, and more. Most importantly, they want to feel like they’ve made intelligent choices, and that they’re getting good value for what many believe are their “investments.” And last but not least, when their friends come over for dinner and say stuff like, “Bob, is that art new?” Bob will share his knowledge (starting with the three-sentence introduction he read 30 seconds after first laying eyes on it), and proceed to overwhelm his friends with his discriminating taste and sophistication– and irrevocably emerge a winner– which Bob could never have done without your (the artist’s) help. Capiche? Excellent.

Several hints for crafting compelling copy:

* Your introductory might subtly suggest typical positive responses that viewers have to your art. If you’re like most artists, you already know what people like about it. So make it easy for first timers, feed them the secrets up front, and save them the trouble of having to mangle their brains trying figure out why they like what they’re looking at.

* Pair a several sentence explanation with each work of art, knowing that specifics are easier to grasp than generalities. It can be about anything– color, shape, size, materials, technique, medium, inspiration, mood, thoughts, justifications, beliefs, the music you listened to while you made it, why you made it, where you made it, how you made it, how long it took to make, and so on. Keep it simple; keep it clear; make viewers want to know more.

Remember– nobody owes you or your oeuvre one nanosecond of attention. It is your duty, and yours alone, to convince people that what you communicate through your art is valid, worthwhile, and engaging enough for them to make it a part of their lives. It’s that simple and no more complicated.

Source : http://www.artbusiness.com

GILE

October 7, 2009

Sering kali kita lebih mudah berkata-kata, namun begitu sampai tahap implementasi, nanti dulu.Di sini terlihat jelas bahwa eksekusi bukan hal yang mudah. Ada beberapa analogi yang mungkin mirip berikut ini. Apakah Anda mau belajar menyetir mobil dari orang yang tidak pernah mengendarai mobil sebelumnya?
Terlalu banyak teori menyebabkan Anda tidak akan bisa merasakan visualisasi. Hal ini membuat pandangan seseorang menjadi sangat terbatas dan hanya melihat suatu permasalahan dari satu sudut pandang.

Akibatnya wajar jika ada istilah populer lainnya, “GILE” yaitu “Great Ideas, Lack of Execution“. Ide-ide yang dilontarkan begitu cemerlang, namun eksekusinya sangat minim. Berikut adalah tiga langkah yang merupakan kunci sukses seorang eksekutor sehingga tidak akan disebut “GILE” lagi.

Take the Risk

Berani ambil risiko.Walaupun banyak teori membahas kemampuan mengeksekusi, ada satu prinsip dasar yang sering dilupakan, yaitu keberanian untuk mengambil risiko. Umumnya,ketika seseorang memiliki sudut pandang terbatas, ia menjadi takut mengambil risiko. Ditambah lagi jika peristiwa yang dialami merupakan peristiwa yang belum pernah terjadi sebelumnya.

Ketika perusahaan berada di zona nyaman, biasanya manajemen menghindari rencana baru di luar kebiasaan perusahaan. Yang lebih parah, para manajemen ini berusaha untuk pindah dari satu zona nyaman ke zona nyaman yang lain. Ketidakmauan manajemen dalam mengambil risiko inilah bisa menyebabkan perusahaan tidak berkembang, atau Read the rest of this entry »

Analisa Kasus: Mengapa Bisnis Zipcar Meraih Sukses

October 2, 2009

mobil_zipcarZipcar adalah salah satu contoh perusahaan yang sukses di era New Wave. Berdasarkan tulisan Pakar Pemasaran Indonesia, Hermawan Kartajaya di www.kompas.com, kasusnya mengingatkan kita bahwa mungkin ada dua kata kunci utama untuk memenangkan persaingan di era New Wave,, yaitu penghubung dan komunitas.
Mereka menjadi connecting hub lewat platform yang disediakan untuk komunitas, sehingga dapat tampil lebih menawan di persaingan. Ditambah kemampuan perusahaan ini dalam mengkomunitaskan konsumennya. Namun apakah hal ini sudah cukup membawa Zipcar mejadi sukses? Ada tiga hal yang membuat Zipcar meraih sukses.

Pertama, ada pada sisi model penetapan harga yang memberi keuntungan pada anggota Zipcar. ; (1) ongkos fixed pada saat menjadi anggota: biaya tahunan yaitu sekitar $50 ditambah dengan $25 untuk aplikasi dan (2) ongkos variable ketika mengendarai: yaitu sekitar $10 per jam (tergantung pada model dari mobil yang dipilih). Kesemuanya sudah termasuk bensin dan asuransi.

Kedua, adalah low-cost strategy. Dapat dilihat bahwa memang yang ditawarkan adalah low-price. Namun strategi low price tidak akan dapat sustainable kalau tidak didukung oleh low-cost strategy. Untuk terus mengelola biaya operasional memang sebuah tantangan buat mereka. Read the rest of this entry »

Cara Membuka Peluang Ekspor

September 17, 2009

bola kapal terbang

Salah satu usaha yang terbukti mampu bertahan pada saat krisis ekonomi adalah sektor usaha kecil dan menengah. Sektor prioritas seperti kerajinan, sandang, peternakan, perikanan, pertanian, perkebunan, serta makanan dan minuman, perlu dikembangkan dengan pertimbangan tidak hanya untuk memenuhi pasar dalam negeri, tetapi juga pasar ekspor. Potensi sumber daya alam dan tenaga kerja sangat memungkinkan penggarapan sektor ini.

Ada beberapa saran yang perlu diperhatikan sebelum kita memulai mencoba pasaran ekspor ke luar negeri :

1.Jangan pernah melakukan trip ke luar negeri untuk mengikuti promosi perdagangan atau pameran dagang sebelum kita benar-benar tahu kebutuhan dan keinginan konsumen. Hal ini perlu diperhatikan terutama untuk produk-produk seperti fashion, tas, tekstil, garmen, sepatu, dan kerajinan tangan.

2.Perlu disiapkan terlebih dahulu katalog serta daftar harga, serta perkiraan jangka waktu pengiriman dan minimum order yang sanggup dikerjakan.

3.Cari sebanyak-banyaknya daftar importir yang berkaitan dengan produk kita, bisa melalui internet, CD, atau buku katalog yang memuat data importir terkini di Indotrade Guide atau bisa diperoleh di BPEN (Badan Pengembangan Ekspor Nasional).

4.Dari informasi yang sudah diperoleh, kita harus mengetahui calon pembeli kita. Read the rest of this entry »

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di Rumah (Bagian V: Strategi Promosi Produk Ekspor)

September 16, 2009

Strategi Promosi produk ekspor []

Cara-cara kreatif dalam mempromosikan produk menjadikan bisnis ekspor mampu bertahan di pasar internasional. Untuk itu, diperlukan strategi yang tepat untuk mempromosikan produk ekspor Anda. Strategi ekspor yang saat ini banyak dilakukan UKM adalah dengan melakukan pameran untuk mendapatkan calon pelanggan.

Pameran
Pameran merupakan satu cara efektif untuk mencari peluang pasar, memperkenalkan usaha, dan menjaring calon pelanggan. Sebelum memutuskan untuk mengikuti pameran, tentukan target pasar terlebih dahulu, dan menganalisa tren pasar. Untuk itu, sesuaikan bentuk dan tema pameran dengan produk yang akan Anda promosikan.

Tidak seperti pengunjung Mall yang tidak tersegmentasi, karakteristik pengunjung pameran sangat spesifik, dan fokus. Menurut Center for Exhibit Industry Research (CEIR), mayoritas pengunjung pameran dagang adalah pengambil keputusan atau orang berpengaruh yang berencana melakukan pembelian dalam kurun waktu 12 bulan kedepan. Sebab itu, jangan kaget jika penjualan produk Anda tidak terlalu signifikan. Pengusaha umumnya lebih tertarik dengan peluang berbisnis dibandingkan membeli produk yang dipamerkan.
Berikut tips agar Anda sukses berpromosi di pameran : Read the rest of this entry »

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di Rumah (Bagian IV: Mempersiapkan Alat Promosi)

September 15, 2009

Mempersiapkan Alat Promosi []

Untuk memperkenalkan produk yang Anda buat ke pasar global, Anda harus melakukan kegiatan promosi yang terencana. Namun sebelum promosi dilakukan, Anda terlebih dahulu mempersiapkan alat promosi dalam bentuk katalog produk.

Katalog produk ini berupa brosur, leaflet ataupun compact disk yang berisi dan memuat segala informasi yang dibutuhkan pembeli. Untuk membuat catalog produk yang menarik, berikut tahapan-tahapan yang perlu Anda lakukan :

1. Membuat Dokumentasi Produk
Dokumentasikan semua produk Anda dalam bentuk foto. Dalam mendokumentasikan produk, Anda harus memperhitungkan bahwa foto produk mampu memberikan gambaran secara tiga dimensional mulai dari panjang, lebar dan tinggi produk.

Tujuannya, pembeli luar negeri memiliki gambaran tentang volume produk.
Selain itu, foto yang Anda buat harus menonjolkan detail dari produk. Baik keunggulan desain, corak, komposisi warna, kerapihan produk dan aspek lainnya. Sebab itu, gunakan background berwarna kontras saat memotret produk agar produk terlihat jelas. Read the rest of this entry »

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di Rumah (Bagian III: Strategi Pengiriman Barang Ekspor)

September 14, 2009

strategi pengiriman barang []

Pasar ekspor dikenal sebagai pasar yang memiliki tuntutan lebih banyak dibandingkan pasar domestik. Jika produk yang dipesan sedikit saja cacat, maka pembeli menjadi enggan untuk meneruskan kerjasamanya dengan Anda.

Di bisnis ekspor ini, Anda harus memiliki strategi dalam mengirimkan barang agar pembeli luar negeri tetap puas. Berikut hal-hal yang harus diperhatikan dalam persiapan pengiriman barang :

Daya tahan barang, Pengiriman barang ekspor memakan waktu lebih lama. Sebab, itu Anda perlu memperhatikan sifat dan daya tahan produk Anda. Apalagi, produk juga akan disimpan dalam container dalam jangka waktu yang cukup lama. Misalnya saja pengiriman barang ke AS yang memakan waktu 1 bulan. Pastikan produk yang Anda kirim berubah bentuk, warna, atau cacat.

Pembungkus, pilih bahan pembungkus yang kuat dan tahan lama karena barang akan ditumpuk di dalam container bersama barang-barang lainnya. Jika pembungkusnya kuat maka barang di dalamnya akan terjaga dengan lebih baik.

Lama produksi, buat perhitungan yang akurat kapan barang akan sampai ke negara tujuan ekspor. Untuk itu, lama produksi perlu dihitung dengan seksama. Ketika membuat penawaran, beritahukan waktu barang tiba dengan tepat. Jikalau barang terlambat, maka pembeli akan kecewa dan Anda pun akan kehilangan peluang bisnis. Perlu diingat, barang yang dibeli oleh pembeli umumnya mengikuti momen-momen tertentu, sehingga jika Read the rest of this entry »

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di Rumah (Bagian II: Memilih Produk)

September 11, 2009

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di RumahKeberhasilan dalam memulai bisnis ekspor juga ditentukan oleh pemilihan produk yang sesuai. Pasar internasional sangat dinamis dengan perubahan selera, tren, mode yang berlangsung cepat. Untuk itu, bisnis ekspor Anda harus bisa beradaptasi dengan keinginan pasar global.

Produk non-primer yang berbasis bahan baku lokal seperti produk interior,tekstil dan batik, bisa menjadi pilihan Anda. Dibandingkan produk primer,yaitu hasil pertanian dan perkebunan, produk non-primer lebih rendah resikonya dan lebih mudah dalam hal proses produksinya. Apalagi belakangan ini produk-produk Indonesia jenis ini semakin digemari di mancanegara.

Jika alasan di atas belum memenuhi rasa keingintahuan Anda, berikut sejumlah alasan lain Anda mempertimbangkan produk non-primer sebagai produk yang akan dijalankan bisnis ekspor Anda (buku Jurus Menembus Pasar Ekspor) :
Ketersediaan Bahan Baku. Indonesia memiliki sumber daya alam yang berlimpah sebagai bahan baku untuk produk-produk non-primer. Sangat disarankan Anda tidak mengimpor bahan baku dari luar negeri karena memiliki dua kelemahan. Pertama, Anda menjadi tergantung pada impor untuk mendapatkan bahan baku. Kedua, impor bahan baku rawan terhadap perubahan harga pengaruh nilai kurs mata uang. Selain itu pajak yang dikenakan juga cukup tinggi.
Kemudahan Pembuatannya. Proses pembuatan produk-produk non primer cenderung lebih mudah, fleksibel, lebih membutuhkan faktor ketekunan dibanding keterampilan dan tidak membutuhkan tenaga kerja dengan tingkat pendidikan tinggi.
Sarat Kreativitas. Pasar internasional menyukai produk non-primer dari Indonesia karena Read the rest of this entry »

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di Rumah (Bagian I)

September 10, 2009

Cara Memulai Bisnis Ekspor di Rumah

Salah satu cara terbaik membangun sebuah bisnis yang sukses ialah melalui kegiatan ekspor/impor. Anda bisa menawarkan bisnis dengan klien di seluruh dunia. Anda tidak perlu memiliki pengalaman sebelumnya, namun harus memiliki manajemen bisnis yang baik.
Sukses memenuhi kebutuhan bisnis ekspor memerlukan perhatian ekstra dan detil. Apakah Anda tahu beberapa produsen lokal menggunakan beragam cara untuk meningkatkan pasar mereka? Atau Anda merencanakan untuk membawa produk Anda ke luar negeri dan ingin menghubungi rekan Anda untuk mendirikan sebuah bisnis?
Jika Anda memiliki kemampuan untuk menjual, dan mempromosikan produk, bisnis impor dan ekspor sesuai untuk Anda. Anda hanya membutuhkan keinginan dan tekad untuk membuatnya bekerja. Silakan mempelajari bisnis ini, dan pertimbangkan risiko serta keuntungannya.

1. Anda dapat memulai bisnis ini di rumah dengan fasilitas telepon, sistem file, kartu nama, dan sebuah mesin untuk menjawab panggilan telepon. Selain itu, buatlah kepala surat yang berkelas dengan desain timbul atau berwarna emas agar Anda terlihat profesional ketika mengirimkan surat penawaran.

2. Melakukan kontak. Langkah yang paling penting dalam mendirikan bisnis Anda adalah mencari rekan berbisnis. Read the rest of this entry »


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